Wisconsin Department of Natural Resouces News Release – Nitrate Webinar Series: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 27, 2021Contact: DNR Office of CommunicationsDNRPress@wisconsin.gov Wisconsin DNR, University Of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension And College Of Agriculture And Life Sciences Announces Nitrate Webinar Series The Wisconsin DNR, University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences To Host Nitrate Webinar Series / Photo Credit: iStock/Imgorthand MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the launch of a virtual webinar series focused on nitrate in Wisconsin. The series will touch on the science and economics around a number of workable approaches for farmers shown to minimize nitrogen losses to groundwater. The webinars will take place Aug. 6, Aug. 13, Aug. 20 and a fourth date to be determined. Presented by the Wisconsin DNR, University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, each 60-minute webinar will take place over the lunch hour with time provided for a Q&A session. Groundwater pollution from human activities and natural sources occurs across Wisconsin, which is particularly concerning for the 70% of Wisconsin residents who get their drinking water from groundwater.  Nitrate is Wisconsin’s most widespread groundwater contaminant, according to Wisconsin’s Groundwater Coordinating Council. Nitrate contamination of groundwater is increasing in extent and severity in the state. Nearly 90% of nitrate in groundwater is due to agricultural activities, including manure spreading and fertilizer application. Other common sources of nitrate include septic systems and sewage treatment practices. Nitrate dissolves easily in water and does not adsorb onto the soil. It can easily be carried into the groundwater by rainwater and melting snow as they make their way through the soil and bedrock into the underlying aquifer. Nitrate impacts Wisconsin’s largest source of drinking water and is an economic loss to farmers. Initiatives completed by university researchers, government and the agriculture industry can help us understand the multiple tools – approaches and agricultural best practices – to reduce nitrogen loss from agriculture.   More information about nitrate in drinking water is available on the DNR website here. Nitrate Webinar Series   Noon - 1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 6 Overview of Nitrate-Nitrogen Loss Models for Use in Agriculture & Estimates of Leachable Nitrogen from a Variety of Wisconsin Farms Speakers: Francisco Arriaga, Professor of Soil Science, UW-MadisonMatt Ruark, Professor of Soil Fertility and Nutrient Management, UW-Madison Join by Zoom here.   Noon - 1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 13 Scenarios for Reducing Manure Applications on Permeable Soils During Fall & Cover Crops: A Review of Research and History of Their Use to Minimize Nitrogen Leaching Losses Speakers: Joe Baeten, DNR Northeast Team Supervisor, Watershed Management BureauKarl Gesch, DNR Nonpoint Pollution Program Coordinator, Watershed Management BureauMark Riedel, DNR Water Resources Management Specialist, Watershed Management Bureau Join by Zoom here.   Noon – 1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 20New Opportunities with Cover Crops for Wisconsin Farmers & Innovative Partnerships and Advances in Agricultural Nitrogen Management Speakers: Robert Myers, Director, Center for Regenerative Agriculture, University of MissouriTom Green, President, Integrated Pest Management Institute of North AmericaKristen Osgood, Integrated Pest Management Institute of North America Join by Zoom here.   *TBD*Preliminary Assessment of Economic Impacts on Wisconsin Farms of Reducing Nitrogen Losses Speakers: Paul Mitchell, Professor of Agriculture and Applied Economics, UW-MadisonDeana Knuteson, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, UW-Madison HorticultureJeremy Beach, Associate Director, Renk Agribusiness Institute

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Comprehensive Plan

What is Comprehensive Plan? 

According to Wisconsin Statute, the Comprehensive Plan shall be made with
the general purpose of guiding and accomplishing a coordinated, adjusted,
and harmonious development of the community. In accordance with existing and future needs, the Comprehensive Plan will promote public health, safety, and the general welfare of the entire community. The Planning Law requires zoning, official mapping, and subdivision regulations be consistent with a Comprehensive Plan

 

When is Comprehensive Plan updated?

The township is required by law to review/update the entire comprehensive plan every 10 years.

 

Current Comprehensive Plan for 2021 - 2041 - Adopted May 11, 2021

 

City of Eau Claire Sewer Service Area Plan

 

Do you have Comprehensive Plan feedback?

Email Wheaton Plan Commission Chair at Wheaton.PlanCommissionE@gmail.com

 

Archived Documents

Below are links to archived past comprehensive plan documents for historical purposes.

Past Comprehensive Plan for 2010 - 2020

Comprehensive  Plan Public Opinion Survey 2019